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Harvesting

Forestry for Biomass  >  Harvesting

Harvesting woodfuel products does not fundamentally differ from harvesting any other forestry products, and it is important to recognise that woodfuel is one of a number of different other product streams which often provide a better economic return. In most cases harvesting operations will combine a number of different products with different qualities, specifications and end uses, based on the available standing timber.

The main factors that will influence the choice of a given harvesting operation are:

These factors will often be inter-dependent, and you will often need to make compromises, depending on your management priorities and the machinery/contractor’s availability. You will also need to have a clear idea of how your products are going to be handled in the ongoing supply chain and how you are going to carry out the work safely.

NB Because of the focus on the small and medium scale, the scope of this guide is limited to logs and woodchips supply chain operations, with stemwood from traditional forestry operations as the main feedstock. Other types of feedstocks and fuels generally require different processes, equipment, and with a few exceptions are only economically viable at large scales. To find out more on these fuels and supply chains see the Sources of Biomass section.


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Forestry for Woodfuel and Timber

Index

  1. Introduction and benefits of woodland management
  2. Fuel from woodland
  3. Buying a woodland
  4. Support for woodland management
  5. Grants, regulations and certification
  6. Woodland health
  7. Forest management plans
  8. Silviculture
  9. Planting Woodland
  10. Managing small areas and volumes
  11. Harvesting
  12. Fuel Processing
  13. Harvesting and Processing Costs
  14. Buying and selling wood
  15. Further Reading
  16. Training